“Comey was a metastatic growth of injustice allowed, if not, encouraged by President Obama.”

“Comey was a metastatic growth of injustice allowed, if not, encouraged by President Obama.”

Feature Posts, News, Opinions

I know titling an article with an anonymous quote is a blatant violation of journalistic standards, but in the modern traditions of the Washington Post, we’ll chalk it up to “when in Rome…” Specifically, when in Rome while it burned and Nero fiddled; that would be more apropos, perhaps, when describing Post standards. Nonetheless, I think it accurately and succinctly sums up my short interview with a friend who is a former Department of Justice appointee and current Law Professor.

I emailed him several times recently, trying in vain to put some perspective on some of the finer nuances of Mr. Comey’s wild ride into infamy. Eventually, I learned my friend was evaluating papers and was annoyed at the prospect of having to discuss the illogic and anti-intellectualism of Jame Comey while trying to maintain his legal reasoning. It was a fair point. I tried a different angle: Explain it to me like you were at dinner party with intellectual, but not politically or legally inclined guests. My attempt at creating an interesting new perspective was greeted with the blunt rejoinder, “that’s why I hate [expletive] dinner parties.”

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It’s All About The Climb

It’s All About The Climb

Feature Posts, News

People often ask me, “why don’t you write more?” They mean no harm, of course, most are actually phrasing it in a complimentary way. To a writer, it’s vaguely like asking a pregnant woman how far along she is; and you better damn well know she’s pregnant in the first place. Every writer is different. Journalists write on a frenetic scale, pushed by deadlines and the need for splashy headlines in perpetuity. Op-Ed types languish around the weekly ‘bleed and leads’ until some self-righteous impulse kicks in to inform the masses what it all really means.

For some of us, we write for the same reason a climber takes on a mountain: because it’s there. Hell, I’ve always thought a moment unwritten is a moment unmemorialized for all time. That begs a certain urgency to capture an event, a place, a moment, and put it down on paper like a placeholder. Besides, if history is written by the victors, then I better damn well do it, because the media is trying erase the present before it can even become the past. The story of Donald J. Trump and his chaotic journey to the White House has captured the imagination of the nation and the world. But the story, the real story, is just beginning.

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Is Congress Killing Our Economic Recovery?

Is Congress Killing Our Economic Recovery?

Economics, Feature Posts, News

There are few things that confuse and aggravate the average person more than the underpinnings of the American economy. What to make of it? Record highs across the Dow, Nasdaq and S&P, seemingly at odds with the latest suspect government labor reports. Which, in turn, are met by perplexing increases in small business jobs, but not corporate ones. For the average worker who keeps a wary eye on their quarterly 401K reports, marrying the economic reality of disjointed labor reports by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics and the National Federation of Independent Businesses and the ADP reports, is near impossible. Turning on the business channel won’t help you make sense of the mess, either.

While no answer is surgical or simple, there is one solution that could bolster our economy to a healthy pace of growth we haven’t seen in more than a decade. In other words: Congress could get off their collective asses and act on tax reform and health care reform. This market is ticking along nicely, making gains off every dazzling media interphase with Budget Director Mick Mulvany and other well-versed policy initiatives from the Trump admin that land in Congress with a thud. Gains have been steady since Trump’s election, but volatility lurks just beneath the surface. That volatility is fueled by the furious and voracious appetite of congressional apathy. Yes, the illustration is a contradiction. Much like the contradiction that Congress represents us and works to improve our lives. Not so much.

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What Tomorrow Will Bring…

What Tomorrow Will Bring…

Feature Posts, News

The trouble with making war with an uncommon enemy, are the uncommon results that tend to follow. I would imagine many such metaphorical wars were waged against Donald J. Trump in the earlier days of his storied career in the Manhattan real estate business. Lessons were learned, enemies made, battles lost, but Trump stores all these historical moments categorically. He draws upon them with an astounding subconscious ease. He can wound as easily as he woos; he comes bearing bouquets and bullets in equal measure. He wants nothing more than for you to think you know him. It’s only then, will he mark his moment. A known commodity in real estate or politics, after all, can be easily priced and sold. Donald J. Trump is not subject to the rules, he is too busy writing them. He is many things, but a known commodity is not one of them.

In my day, I’ve seen some titans of politics up close. I’ve watched them work, read their stories of bravado, and studied what remained as a legacy.  Lately, I’ve taken up my old, scattered academic pursuit of executive comparisons in search of what could help draw a fair picture of Trump’s presidential forbears. I can find precious little that can be attributed to any single president, but many traits that are found among the best.

For instance, I can sense the bluster and righteous anger of Andrew Jackson at all things that defy the people of this nation a fair shot at prosperity. I can feel the thunderous temerity of Abraham Lincoln to muster this nation to its God-given potential. I can envision the searing stare of Teddy Roosevelt as he would cast his eyes upon the sickening wealth and the antitrust laden moral rot of Silicon Valley. I can hear the endless dreams and enduring hope of John F. Kennedy. I can identify both the genius of foreign policy and the virulent contempt for the lying media that was embodied by Richard Nixon. I can feel the beating heart of Ronald Reagan, who hated evil and loved freedom with equal zeal. And most telling of all, I can identify no such similarity, not in the least, that Trump shares with his immediate predecessor.

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FBI’s & Other Agencies Abuse the 702 FISA Court Laws

FBI’s & Other Agencies Abuse the 702 FISA Court Laws

Corruption, Feature Posts, News

Below is a 99 page document detailing the FBI and other agencies abusing the 702 FISA court laws. This is the tip of the iceberg. A response is due from FBI on June 17th. The characterization of the response as “constitutionally vital” cannot be overstated. Please read and let me know any questions you might have. This is the precursor to the assignment of a real and actual Special Prosecutor.

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

“Half an inch of water and you think you’re gonna drown.” John Prine

“Half an inch of water and you think you’re gonna drown.” John Prine

Feature Posts, Legal, Media, News, Politics

Times like these, I hear the rusty old voice of that mailman turned songwriter, John Prine. Let’s face it, those lyrics ring true these days. Who hasn’t felt a little like they were drowning in this wave of fake news? Each day brings a slew of negative media against the president. Stories laden with unnamed sources of “past and current officials” speaking on condition of anonymity. Please. Enough.

But they won’t stop. It’s all they have. Every twelve hours, a cavalcade of conjecture, a tsunami of innuendo and, well, sometimes even two scoops of ice cream ooze from our TVs like primordial slime. The ebbs and flows of insanity and hilarity play off each other like a tennis volley. There we sit, dull-eyed and nauseous, watching the fate of our constitutional republic bandied about like sport. Please. Enough.

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James B. Comey: A One Man Wall of Injustice

James B. Comey: A One Man Wall of Injustice

Feature Posts, Legal, Media, News, Politics

Let’s take a minute, maybe a deep breath, and walk through President Trump’s decision to fire the Director of the FBI. It’s not a walk that makes any sense unless you walk backwards. The established media and beltway democrats will do almost anything to persuade you to do otherwise.

The soul-crushing, ethos crippling power of presidential campaign politics has brought down smarter and better men than James Comey. He is merely the latest cautionary tale detailing a DC bureaucrat who fought out of his weight class. While J. Edgar Hoover may have admired Comey’s taste for playing both sides against the middle, he almost certainly would have advised against dancing with a lame duck devil in Obama. Hoover was keenly aware of the changing seasons in presidential politics and was a master at manipulating that power vacuum to his favor. Comey lacked even the most remote political sense to navigate the turbulent waters he found himself in.

That’s not to infer Comey is a sympathetic figure in all of this. Few FBI directors in the bureau’s history have been maligned as he has by both sides of the political aisle. Prosecutorial politics is the most dangerous game to be played in Washington. You certainly don’t paint a target on a major party presidential nominee and then let them walk away. Not only did Comey commit that blunder, he then informed the world, twice, that he had all the reason in the world to bring charges, but inexplicably did not. Here is where we must tread off the beaten path to trace Comey’s travels to the trash bin of history.

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The Great Experiment: Making Sense Common Again

The Great Experiment: Making Sense Common Again

Feature Posts, News, Politics

Donald J. Trump has been known to describe himself as a “common sense politician,” as opposed to a traditional partisan ideologue. He is not wrong. He is now a walking and talking embodiment of the empirical impossibility of introducing common sense to the dysfunctional cesspool of Washington. 100 days in, I’ve seen enough to know I’m witnessing a controlled political experiment that will illustrate our worst fears as traditional republicans in a two-party system. A place where common sense is exceedingly uncommon, where results are as rare as a lunar eclipse and happen under similar lighting conditions.

President Trump is not a contradiction, it just looks that way to those immersed in the beltway scene. I recently spent an hour a few feet from the man as he gave a furious and surgically strategic speech to a capacity crowd in deep blue Harrisburg, PA. Shoulder to shoulder with the masses, I joined the fray in expressing my outrage towards a rogue and irresponsible media. I joined in the somewhat good-natured cat calls towards the congressmen present for the lack of resolute and actionable results. For a few shining moments we all once again embraced the promise, the tantalizing precept that a common sense, deal maker could usher in a new era of American prosperity. Then, with tragic and swift speed, that precept was challenged yet again by the news of another six month budget extension. Ostensibly, it appears an even-handed deal sparing both parties the political suicide of embracing a government shutdown. Deeper, though, we see the hallmarks of classic beltway capitulation…common sense meeting the immovable object.

The president didn’t pick this team. He didn’t draft them or sign them as free agents. He didn’t pick the coaches and he can only make strong suggestions as to the game plan he wants to deploy. His “team” is named Congress, and they’re pretty much the Cleveland Browns in the world of politics. Nonetheless, the president must own this team and find a way to win. Only this metaphor fails to reveal the deep divisions of power that cloud our current political landscape. Trump can’t unilaterally replace Speaker Ryan. It doesn’t work that way (but that doesn’t stop me from internally visualizing the act on a daily basis as a part of my meditation exercises). After all, even if you want to fire a head coach, make sure your GM isn’t his best friend from back home. Continue reading “The Great Experiment: Making Sense Common Again”

Trump and Obama: A Comparison of Goals, Strategies and Tactics

Trump and Obama: A Comparison of Goals, Strategies and Tactics

Feature Posts, Military, News, Politics

While campaigning for president, Donald Trump was severely critical of Barrack Obama’s foreign policy. He drew particular attention to his predecessor’s preference for announcing to the world his military strategies. Obama’s decision to move troops into Mosul and announce it publicly weeks in advance was a particular sore spot with Trump. In one debate after another Trump warned that if he were elected President he would not be foolish enough to tell his enemies his military strategies, lest he give them an opportunity to take countermeasures. The heartburn many Trump supports are feeling right now over the Syrian missile strike is due to the different ways in which Obama and Trump publicly discuss their use of the military. This article will explain how different approaches to discussing foreign policy can shape public perception and create concerns.

It will help to have a basic understanding of the different types of military actions, which can be roughly divided into three categories: goals, strategies, and tactics. Goals are the things we hope to accomplish. Strategies are the plans or blueprints we devise to achieve our goals. Tactics are the specific tasks we undertake to support a goal. A company of soldiers may be sent to a village to remove terrorists. This is a goal. Once a goal is established, the next step is deciding how it’s going to be accomplished. When we discuss how something is going to be done we’re talking about strategies and tactics. Continue reading “Trump and Obama: A Comparison of Goals, Strategies and Tactics”

60 Tomahawk Missiles & a 1,000 Questions

60 Tomahawk Missiles & a 1,000 Questions

Feature Posts, Military, News, Politics

Politicians, per se, are not a complicated bunch. Oh, sure, they fancy themselves worldly and mysterious guardians of democracy; but they’re easier to read than my daughter’s edition of “Everybody Poops” and the commonalities don’t end there.

Donald J. Trump is no politician. That’s precisely why he confounds the media and Congress, alike. He’s not a man given to structured policy schematics, abbreviated session calendars or choreographed PowerPoint presentations. He has an objective, and every day that objective isn’t reached is a day that must produce tangible momentum towards reaching it the next day. Everything we do know about the man, is outweighed only by what we don’t know.

Normalizing the abnormal seems to be the order of the day; so why be surprised we have a president who will fire off 60 tomahawk missiles at a Syrian air base unannounced on a Thursday evening…after dinner with the Chinese President…from his beach resort residence? Wait, what? Yeah, that’ll grab your attention if you’re a low information voter. You must’ve thought Trump would be buried in a White House bunker calling out coordinates. That’s not Donald Trump and that’s not how he handles business.

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