The Politics Of Impeachment: Nixon’s Lost War Against Establishment Was Not In Vain

The Politics Of Impeachment: Nixon’s Lost War Against Establishment Was Not In Vain

Feature Posts, Legal, News, Opinions, Politics

I’ve seen this movie before. As one who wasn’t born in time to have witnessed the trials and tribulations of Nixon’s presidency, I grew to consume the facts of the story voraciously later in life. There is no sufficient sole source account of Nixon’s odessey. You must commit yourself to a deep and comprehensive exploration of all available accounts and form a consensus from the collective works. If you undertake such an academic journey, you will see a pattern; a pattern of subversive and insidious attacks waged by the establishment on the presidency. I don’t mean to imply merely attacks on the president, Nixon himself, but the entire executive branch. The war plan was executed with brilliant and reckless abandon, creating a pressured environment designed to force Nixon into falling prey to his own fears and insecurities. His battle may have been lost almost exactly 43 years ago today, but his testimony is alive and speaking soft words of caution to this day.

Ellsberg, Rosenberg, Rodino, etc. The names are different, but the games are the same. Congressman Drinan was every bit the crackpot moron in 1973 that Maxine Waters is today. The semblance is only shattered by the persistence of a single James Brown-esque wig. Like Trump, Nixon was also riddled with issues within his own administration. Henry Kissinger routinely violated Nixon’s trust by running to the NY Times, leaking information to undermine Nixon and raise his own profile. Ever wonder how Kissinger has maintained his beloved media status, despite being entrenched in clandestine planning to bomb Cambodia and dispatch false narratives about ending the Vietnam War for political purposes? Well, I’ll tell you: He earned his keep by leaking to the media. A practice to this day he espouses. My word of caution to President Trump, don’t trust that your conversations with the aging and manipulative Kissinger are confidential. And the cantankerous news reporter Dan Schorr, remember him? He swore before Congress that Nixon was deliberately undermining the press and challenging the credibility of the media. He bemoaned this was dangerous to the 1st Amendment. Phooey. Where have I heard that line recently? What is old is new again.

Trump and Nixon share a great deal in common, sure. Both are American idealists. They think in terms of big achievements, and abhor the resistance of bureaucracy. However, they are drastically different people who come from starkly different backgrounds. Nixon was a dirt poor Quaker from agricultural California, his modest upbringing stayed with him until the end. It was a nagging voice of uncertainty in the dead of night, it made him mean and cynical. It also drove him to always, always, take stock of his enemies and their motivations against him. Contempt of the press and the establishment aside, Donald Trump is a different story. We know his story, and we know his motivations in life were not to assume the highest political office in the land. Yet here he is, and here he shall stay.

There is no comparison to the series of bad decisions, conspiracy to obstruct, and other things that led to Nixon’s resignation. Frankly, were I to list them, it would only serve to further impugn Nixon’s character. Suffices to say, they, in summation, bear no resemblance to anything in our current news cycle regarding President Trump. The game plan deployed by the opposition is the only common thread. This time, however, they are missing even the appearance of criminality. It simply isn’t there. There will be no John Dean testimony or explosive Butterfield revelations. In fact, if anything, Democrat voters may be incensed by the deliberate hyper-billing of wrongdoing by Trump that doesn’t exist.

Bobby Mueller is no Archibald Cox, but he’s pretty darn close. Just like Rod Rosenstein is no Elliot Richardson, or is he? This, you see, is the real symmetry to be found in the curious cases of the establishment v Nixon/Trump. Remarkably, Nixon’s acting Attorney General, Richardson, solicited the insanely liberal Solicitor General for Kennedy, Archibald Cox, to be the special prosecutor. It was an incredible development, one largely ignored by history. The hypocrisy was stunning, and the agreed to order was even more so, stating the scope would cover “all offenses arising out of the 1972 election … involving the president…” Like Trump, Nixon was publicly forced to coldly embrace Cox. Behind the scenes, was a different story. Nixon was beside himself. He was quoted as saying, “If Richardson searched specifically for the man whom I least trusted, he could hardly have done better.” History, meet your new Richardson: Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein.

It’s painfully obvious now, to myself and the president, that a series of miscalculations from seemingly loyal cabinet members can lead to uncomfortably hot water. How did we get here? We are here because Attorney General Jeff Sessions put us here. There is no debate, no rational excuses to cover this brazen fact. It may not have been purposeful, but if it wasn’t, then it was ineptitude. Like Hillary might say, “what difference does it make?” It doesn’t. We are here. We are stuck with the ultimate establishment swamp warrior in Bobby Mueller. If a man will lie before Congress to justify a war resulting in the killing of hundreds of thousands of Iraqis and thousands of American military, he will lie about this investigation. If he insists on violating the scope of the executive order by investigating things that have nothing to do with the past election, and everything to do with financial dealings and tax returns from a long time ago, then must be fired. Come what may, letting Mueller play Dick Tracy for a year into the dealings of the president, his entire campaign team and family, is not an option. Mueller is breaking the law. Comey has broken the law. Obama’s entire White House staff has broken laws. And Jeff Sessions, he merely broke our hearts.

Historians love to flippantly refer to Nixon’s demise as “it wasn’t the crime, it was the cover up.” Not so. A cursory perusal through the transcripts of the WH tapes reveal a litany of criminal conspiracies. There is no need for a cover up without a crime. Ultimately, my advice to President Trump would be to give no safe harbor to enemies who would break laws to ensnare you in establishment traps. You have committed no crimes in connection with this election and Russia, sir. In that vein, you are free to govern the investigations accordingly. Should they steer outside of the fold, fire them. It is the lesson of history that tells us: the power of the executive is in the application of its authority. Excise this cancer, sir, before it becomes a metastatic monster that consumes your agenda.

Nixon is speaking to us from beyond the grave. He’s telling us it’s not personal, it’s business. He messed up, and he knew it. You haven’t, and we all know it. In the absence of a crime, only supposition reigns. In such confusion, our enemy thrives; in such shadows, they multiply. History is our roadmap, and our enemies are counting on us to ignore that and forge ahead into the unknown. But we know better, don’t we? We know the longer this drags on, the worse it will get. Fiction becomes fact without the benefit of scrutiny. Who among our media, or among congress, will be so discerning? None.

Mark Felt was Deep Throat. He was a crooked FBI executive who sought only to bring down the president. He made literary heroes out of two lazy journalists, whose only apparent job was to solicit illegal leaks from Felt in parking garages. Felt would later be convicted on multiple charges of violating the civil rights of Americans in the course of his FBI duties. He was a hack, a derelict and a leaker. He was Deep State personified. Has this story been told? No. Is FBI counsel James Baker our current Mark Felt? Is he peddling lies, instead of facts? Is Comey, or McCabe? The Deep State is alive and well, lo after these many years. As we approach the anniversary of Nixon’s resignation, we vow not be victimized by the swamp again.

Impeachment is not imminent. That being the case, it changes little in the way this “investigation” should be handled… Move swiftly, move purposefully and move strategically. Use history as a guide, use it wisely. Most importantly, remember Nixon’s final words to his staff 43 years ago, “always remember, others may hate you, but those who hate you don’t win unless you hate them, and then you destroy yourself.”

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

Beware the Rainbow Retailers and the Sunshine Salesmen

Beware the Rainbow Retailers and the Sunshine Salesmen

Feature Posts, News, Politics

Winning isn’t easy. Nobody ever said it was. Those in our movement who had false hopes of a little downward relief from the Sisyphean task of winning, must now admit the struggle will continue. We shall earn our victories only through laborious struggles and the dispatching of sheer political will. It will take time, and significant political pressure.

For Donald Trump, the application of pressure and time is not a foreign concept, but dealing with a recalcitrant and unyielding adversary like Congress is something new. After all, he can’t simply walk away from the negotiating table, not without surrendering his entire agenda. Indeed, we are outnumbered and outflanked on all sides by an enemy who has had 30 years to fortify their defenses. Our march will not be unabated, our plan of attack will not be static, and our gains will be hard fought. Ignore anyone who tells you otherwise.

President Trump is a political newcomer, relatively speaking, new to the ways of Washington and the myriad of backwater minutiae that comes with it. Yet he is evolving, and he is doing so at a relatively rapid pace. In less than 200 days, he is identifying his mistakes, rectifying misplaced delegation of authority and engaging in bold cabinet moves. What the enemy identifies as chaos, is anything but to President Trump. Admittedly, from the outside, it appears as if there is a frenzied mass of confusion in the White House; from inside the eye of the hurricane, Trump sees it all and maneuvers in ways most beltway types could never fathom. Chess, the game most attributed to Trump’s forward thinking strategy, is actually far too timid and passive of a description to ascribe to the president’s style. I find it more suitable to compare it to a Patton-like proclivity to evaluate tank warfare. His style is loud and confrontational, but deftly measured in its strategy and execution. Hence the president’s affinity for seeking counsel from Generals. A military plan is not complete without several contingencies to be carried out in the event of exigent circumstances. Trump now knows that DC is just one big walking, talking exigent circumstance. He espouses a political philosophy that if it isn’t working, fix it; if you can’t fix it, nix it. Just like a General, Trump knows ‘two is one’ and ‘one is none’… Always be ready to enact the pivot protocol.

This is war, make no mistake about it. It’s a cold civil war for the soul of this country. If Trump had an inkling of this as he descended down the escalator more than two years ago, he has sinced affirmed it in his heart. The acceptable political casualty rate on our side grows every day, rightfully so. Side deals, handshakes and favors must cease and desist. Disloyalty must be displaced and weakness removed. Slowly, but effectively, this administration is ridding itself of the insidious RNC factions that dwell within like a malignancy. Establishment republicans were not behind the president, nor are they owed a protracted opportunity to show their evolution. Fire them.

So, with that in mind, I like to remind myself frequently that I owe my loyalty to the one man who surrendered his time and treasure to rescue his country. I bear no such necessity to those from the campaign, nor those who are currently in his orbit. I am cautious and wary of those who preach patience and decry the need for changes. For the most part, I find people who stand steadfast in support of someone not named Donald Trump, to have interests of their own. More than any other administration, since Carter, I think Trump should be afforded the opportunity to make changes in his ranks. He tried it the “traditional” way, by appeasing the big law firms, favorites of congress and some friends of contributors. That way has yielded mixed results thus far. These changes don’t happen in a vacuum, though.

For that reason, I pay little mind to what I call the “rainbow retailers and the sunshine salesmen,” who happily chide us to go on our way and entrust the outcome to the powers that be… With all due respect, no way. As well, I will put little stock in a threat from a republican senator to not fire Jeff Sessions, just as I will a congessman warning not to fire Steve Bannon. Both are ridiculous insults to the president. Try paddling in a canoe with somebody looking to go in the opposite direction, it’s not fun.

What we actually need now is a movement of unrivaled and incomparable activism within our ranks. We need to dig deeper, think smarter and fight back against apathy harder than ever. If we seek to educate ourselves to a level not previously attempted by an electorate, we help the president, ourselves and our country. Let’s take some personal responsibility for our future and our president’s agenda. We owe it to ourselves and we owe it to President Trump. I pledge to help in any way I can, but I will not stand aside and ignore the brutal reality of our enemy’s vision. I believe news should be reported as neither good, nor bad; just true. Facts, after all, are not always fun.

May God bless Donald J. Trump, long may he reign…

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

Enough! Republicans Are Committing Assisted Political Suicide

Enough! Republicans Are Committing Assisted Political Suicide

Corruption, Feature Posts, Legal, Politics

Ever so subtly, the seeds of division are being sown within conservative circles. You, the Trump supporter, are the frog they are bringing to a boil. Sorry folks, this ain’t a hot-tub. Who has their hands on the stove? Some readily known characters like Charles Krauthammer, Bill Kristol, Stephen Hayes and George Will; and some surprising new faces like Tucker Carlson, Ann Coulter and Newt Gingrich. The latter group is the most indefensible and dangerous to the cause.

More importantly, and more to the point, the 800 pound gorilla in the Oval Office was never really the Russian adventures into the election. Instead, it is the shadow of a diminutive Jeff Sessions that is actually the culprit of this dreaded and interminable pall. There can be no mistaking this as a fact. Sessions should have removed himself from consideration as Attorney General the moment a Democrat Senator asked about recusal. He never once intimated to the White House he was even considering a recusal in any matter. That’s a dereliction of duty and a betrayal that vastly outweighs any contribution as a surrogate on the campaign trail. I mean, seriously, did we need him to carry Alabama? Loyalty is a two-way street. Trump, in my opinion, held up his end and Sessions has not. But like the infomercial says, “but wait, there’s more…!”

Sessions, and the little known legal insider in DC, Chuck Cooper, also signed off on a disastrous series of decisions. One, again, never even notifying the White House you were considering a recusal was a horrific act of malfeasance. It is, quite literally, responsible for the inception of this entire Russia witch hunt. Next, they settled on an order of delegated power that gave rise to their next biggest mistake: hiring Rod Rosenstein. It’s baffling beyond measure. Here is a quote from someone who worked with Rosenstein in a professional capacity, “Rod would have gotten a Hillary or Jeb Bush position at DOJ, but I never dreamed that our guys would self inflict this wound and give him such a dangerous position.” The president, only now being made aware of Rosenstein’s famously flexible political leanings, was right to blast him in his recent interview. Rod has never held a private sector job and thrives in the seedy underworld of revolving DC doors that produce hideously entrenched bureaucratic monsters.

Jeff Sessions, Chuck Cooper, and White House counsel Don McGhan, owe the president a huge apology. Unwittingly or not, they have given aid and comfort to the undemocratic and unconstitutional Mueller investigation. The absurdity of a president under an all encompassing microscope by his own administration. It’s maddening and I don’t begrudge the president for saying so, either. With every tweet about “I like Sessions, it’s not his fault” or “Sessions is loyal, the president should never have called him out like that,” Trump gets angrier and angrier. This president is boxed in on all sides by the Quixotic misadventures of Bob Mueller, and his supporters are shedding tears for the man who put him there. I couldn’t write this script.

So, by all means, defend Jeff Sessions and rally to the cause of keeping your favorite staffer (insert name here), but you’re not helping President Trump by doing it. Those inside the never Trump circle high-five each other each time they succeed in dividing the ranks of Trump supporters at the base. What we have on our hands is a quiet insurrection. The seeds have been planted, and to grow, they need to be nourished by the discontent and division of the Trump base. Those who will balk at this concept as advocating blind loyalty in the president, take heed, that is exactly what I’m advocating at this point in time. Any less, and we risk giving roots to something malignant and amorphous; something that will be beyond any measure of control. They are hunting the president, and they need republican diversity of opinion to succeed. If that sounds monolithic and reeks of anti-intellectualism, so be it. If they want to hunt the president, they will not do so on my property.

I know this stuff gets confusing. I know we have more people tracking politics than ever before in our history. It’s causing growing pains in the movement and that’s natural. But the democrats are united against Trump, therefore we must unite behind him. Any other scenario spells doom for our political and economic future. There is no winnable formula for republicans without Trump’s base of support. Those who dwell in shadows dreaming of a Pence presidency, know this: we love Mike Pence, but we will never forgive any act, even by omission, that would result in his ascension. Never.

If the president says you are eating meatloaf, grab a fork and smile. If you would rather qualify your support with your favorite pet cause, go right ahead. Be sure to enjoy your self-satisfied stand on principle, because the next meal you get will be rationed by a democrat.

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

Unhinged: Washington Post Plays Typhoid Mary for the CIA

Unhinged: Washington Post Plays Typhoid Mary for the CIA

Feature Posts, Media, News, Politics

I can almost hear the conversation after the last election in the Post’s editorial boardroom: “If some bots in Macedonia can infiltrate the Internet with fake news and innuendo, just imagine what we can do!” Followed by someone remarking, “Bezos will love it.” Sure enough, the Post has taken an almost hysterical and frenzied approach to spreading rumors and outright lies through “anonymous sources” and “people close to the current or prior administration.” It’s remarkable just how unremarkable the rest of the established media has found the Post’s dreadful record of accuracy during this time period. It’s propaganda now, plain and simple: A virulent strain of misinformation permeating every sector of a diseased and maligned Fourth Estate.

We’ve been here before; deviantly manipulated by lying, cynical intelligence agencies directed to provide a surgical and pre-packaged lie for public consumption. WMDs in Iraq, anyone? Then CIA Director George Tenet stood before the 9/11 Commission and lied about meeting with President Bush in August of 2001 regarding a very specific terror threat report. In fact, it was later revealed he met with Bush, after all. Twice. Lies. A common theme in the most vitally important intelligence game of all, the one called “cover your ass.” Tenet is also well known to be responsible for doctoring a false Intel report regarding a connection between Saddam’s Iraq and Al Qaeda, which directly contributed to the humiliating and career-ending presentation to the UN by Secretary of State Colin Powell.

Lies. All conceived by our own Intel Agencies to get a desired result. It worked then, convincing 2/3 of Americans that Iraq possessed WMDs, and it worked now, convincing 2/3 of Americans that Russia tampered with our election. The Tenet protocol didn’t stop with his retirement in disgrace. It was borne out during the Obama era under his old protege, John Brennan. Brennan spearheaded a similar ulterior operation to deceive us, from November to now, that the Russians did anything substantial to massage the results of our presidential elections. Brennan, using Tenet like manipulation, disseminated misleading Intel reports to media sources that indicated a false narrative. Then going on TV, and before Congress, and saying something totally different. It’s a bait and switch operation that plays right into “cover your ass.” It’s also predicated on lies and weaponized intelligence.

The Washington Post, for its part, much like its majority owner, Jeff Bezos, is functioning as a CIA propaganda machine. There is no fundamental difference between the Post to the Deep State mission than Pravda’s mission under Stalin. No discernible difference at all. The Intel community and the Fourth Estate are “bedded and wedded” at this point. This is a marriage made in hell for the American people. Our “free and open” media is actually entrenched and closed off in a mission of concerted lies and innuendo; imposed upon by a subterranean army of subterfuge, acting at the behest of the former administration. The only facts I can find that exist without dispute in this media barrage, are that our mainstream press has been hopelessly compromised and our Intel community is dangerously and inherently broken.

In 2002, then Chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Bob Graham, issued a statement on the work of the Intel community leading up to and after 9/11: “The administration wasn’t using intelligence to inform their judgment; they were using intelligence as part of a public relations campaign to justify their judgement.” Sound familiar? Looks and sounds an awful lot like the Obama administration from November 9th until January 20th, and beyond, doesn’t it? A final report was issued from the committee in 2004 that contained a remarkable quote, one that will undoubtedly sum up the Russia Intel summary in the future. I’ll make it a paragraph unto its own, so you can read twice, if not more, to grasp its prescience…

“The Senate report…found the US Intelligence Community to suffer from a broken corporate culture and poor management that resulted in (assessments) which were completely wrong in almost every respect.”

Staggeringly accurate statement as to what is occurring today; and stunningly effective with the assistance of a complicit media, led by Bezos’ Washington Post. Together, a compromised media and weaponized Intel community have again successfully deceived 2/3 of our country for their own seedy and surreptitious mission. The system is broken. The threat is real. The chair is against the wall, for all you Red Dawn fans out there.

The mission of the media should be accurate reporting and accountability, not shady hearsay and unnamed sources. The mission of our Intel community should be keeping our country safe from those who wish it harm, not contriving a made up narrative to undermine a democratically elected President Trump. So, to quote the Wallflowers song: “reboot the mission.”

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

Team Trump’s New Strategy: Vetting More, Betting Less

Team Trump’s New Strategy: Vetting More, Betting Less

Feature Posts, Legal, News, Politics

Wick Media Series Part 1: Rod Rosenstein

I’ve spent the past two weeks peeling back the layers of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein like an onion.  With every layer I peeled back, I found one deep state connection after another.  The network of government lawyers in DC is a dazzling matrix of dinner party pals, Ivy League marriages, and is probably the one place where bipartisanship flourishes; provided you subscribe to naked and uninhibited reciprocity.  It’s here, like a yellowed and over-stuffed rolodex, where you will find the seedlings that sprouted the endlessly and awkwardly enduring government career of Rod J. Rosenstein.

Rosenstein graduated in 1989 from Harvard Law with honors, where he had a spot on the coveted Harvard Law Review. He went to clerk for Judge Douglas Ginsberg, who you might remember as the second successive failed Supreme Court nomination, after Robert Bjork, by Ronald Reagan in 1987. After which, Rod joined the ever so cleverly entitled Public Integrity Section of the Criminal Division at the Justice Department. Exactly none of you will be surprised to know that office was run Robert Mueller.  Mueller and Rosenstein go back to 1990.

After serving in a couple related positions in the Clinton DOJ, Rosenstein was hired by US Attorney Lynne Battaglia in 1997.  Battaglia was a former Chief-of-Staff to long-time Democratic US Senator Barb Mikulski, of Maryland, a figure who was seen as crucial in keeping Rosenstein employed later on through the Obama Administration. Next stop on the government gravy train, at the behest of Senator Mikulski, was a nomination to serve as US Attorney in Maryland. A few years later, in this capacity, then Attorney General Eric Holder handpicked Rosenstein to prosecute the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General James Cartwright for leaking classified intelligence.  Rosenstein was said to be so “aggressive” in his handling of the case, that the General was forced to accept a guilty plea.  Seems like a lot work considering Obama turned around and pardoned him.

In 2007, Rosenstein had a shot at what most assume to be his ultimate career goal: a federal judgeship.  Bush nominated Rod for the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals, but it was a bridge too far, even for his political benefactor, Sen. Mikulski, who could not get her colleague Sen. Cardin to drop the “blue slip” against Rosenstein.  The Democrats in the Senate dutifully held the vacancy until 2009 when Obama would fill it.

President Trump nominated Rosenstein to serve as a deputy Attorney General on January 13, 2017.  His Senate confirmation was not until April 25th and was a resounding 94-6 in favor.  His fellow Deputy nominee, Rachel Brand, received no such bipartsan support, passing by a party-line vote.  One look at each of their resumes will tell you, it wasn’t about qualifications that influenced these differentials.

Enough, though.  This isn’t a glorified Wikipedia piece on the life and times of government legal beagle swimming in the swamp for 27 years.  This is about a rare breed whose survival tendencies are more chameleon than cockroach.  I’ve talked with several lawyers, all of whom worked with or near Rosenstein, and they all shared the assessment that the only thing exceptional about Rod was his unbridled desire to remain in the public sector.

It’s not uncommon for the same four or five Washington law firms to provide safe harbor for lawyers of both parties during administration changes. That never seemed to cross Rod’s mind, and for that, most of his former colleagues found him…”odd.”

They weren’t the only ones who had reservations about him.  None other than the infamous king of the cross-ailse cha-cha, James B. Comey, wasn’t comfortable with Rosenstein, either.  According to Lawfare blog editor, and Comey confidant, Ben Wittes, Comey said that “Rod is a survivor…and you don’t get to survive that long across administrations without making compromises…so I have concerns.”  Comey made this alleged admission in late March, mere weeks before his queasiness was proven justified. Somewhat justified; I should qualify.

One particular lawyer who witnessed Rod in action as the US Attorney in Maryland told me, “It was like Rod was running a farm team in the Maryland office for Eric Holder at Justice Main. He sent quite a few top deputies to Holder, including the ultimate fall guy for Holder’s ‘Fast and Furious’ operation, Jamie Weinstein.” But that wasn’t all he said, “Rod is a Lanny Breuer guy, too. Funny how nobody knows Lanny’s name.  Ask Sen. Chuck Grassley, he knows it. He demanded his resignation after ‘Fast and Furious’ hit the House and Senate hearing circuit.” And finally, “Lanny let UBS and HSBC walk with fines…and if those weren’t financial crimes warranting jail terms, then there haven’t been any in my lifetime.”

From there I explored whether or not Rosenstein’s proclivities would lean towards recusal in light of his role in Comey’s firing.  One fellow Bush appointee who worked with Rod opined that “(Rod) is clever enough to know staying in charge is his only job protection, and for the ‘experts’ he likes to keep around him.” Of particular interest, he noted “someone in Congress needs to ask Rod if he’s spoken about the ongoing investigation or the selection of Bob Mueller with anyone from Covington & Burling…that would drain the blood from his face.”

It is no secret to anyone in DC that Mueller and Rosenstein have a relationship.  Nor is it a secret that Mueller and Comey are very, very close.  I was trying to come to terms with this floated notion, made by some, that Rosenstein is a potential “Trojan Horse” that has caused mayhem since his arrival.  I’m no less convinced as to that possibility now, than I was before I made more inquiries.

Not the least of which was a copy of a letter received from a friend on Sen. Grassley’s staff from early March, stating how qualified and upstanding Rod would be as a Deputy Attorney General to Jeff Sessions.  Signed proudly by reputed ‘Fast and Furious’ architect Lanny Breuer, liberal Eric Holder acolyte Mythili Raman and (here’s where my stomach turned) new FBI nominee Christopher Wray.  After my concerned reply, the staffer’s texted response only heightened my anxiety, “LOL…you didn’t know that? Mueller, Comey and Wray were tight back in the day. They all laced the gloves up against Cheney together.  There’s no daylight here, man.  Don’t complain to us.  Call Chuck Cooper…”

With that, I realize the conservative media has failed us.  Maybe I have failed you, too.  I will do my best to get better and keep Trump supporters more informed.  It’s a maze of incestuous, self-serving protectionism.  That doesn’t mean we lay down and take it., though. That’s not how Trump nation turned the tables in 11/9/16 and we aren’t changing.

Now, anybody got a bottle of aspirin and Chuck Cooper’s cell number?

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

“Half an inch of water and you think you’re gonna drown.” John Prine

“Half an inch of water and you think you’re gonna drown.” John Prine

Feature Posts, Legal, Media, News, Politics

Times like these, I hear the rusty old voice of that mailman turned songwriter, John Prine. Let’s face it, those lyrics ring true these days. Who hasn’t felt a little like they were drowning in this wave of fake news? Each day brings a slew of negative media against the president. Stories laden with unnamed sources of “past and current officials” speaking on condition of anonymity. Please. Enough.

But they won’t stop. It’s all they have. Every twelve hours, a cavalcade of conjecture, a tsunami of innuendo and, well, sometimes even two scoops of ice cream ooze from our TVs like primordial slime. The ebbs and flows of insanity and hilarity play off each other like a tennis volley. There we sit, dull-eyed and nauseous, watching the fate of our constitutional republic bandied about like sport. Please. Enough.

This entire narrative is built on lies. The absurdity of our new reality has rendered DC into a caricature of itself. A self-obsessed cesspool of obstinance and obfuscation. If there is no honor among thieves, then I attribute none to Congress. These arrogant and misguided souls are content to carry out guerrilla tactics and choose tactical retreat as a first measure of defense in all instances. Invariably, they all campaign vigorously, get re-elected and then disappear into the oblivion of the beltway. Watching out only for each other and the special interests that fill the war chests of campaign funds. The sunshine of transparency sends them scattering like cave-dwelling albinos. It never ends. They talk. They balk. They point fingers when the day yields nothing. Please. Enough.

As overwhelmed as we feel with the daily onslaught of negative, propped up pieces of propaganda landing in our laps, we must recognize its only two inches of water, we ain’t gonna drown. We control a lot more than we think. Sure, it doesn’t feel that way. We see our champion, our president under siege. We feel helpless, but we are not. Not at all. We can turn our angst and our anxiety onto the closest target: Congress. They were elected to facilitate the agenda of Donald J. Trump. We certainly didn’t send our congressman and women to DC for the express purpose of chasing fruitless investigations into fairy tales about Russia. For the love of all things holy, do your freaking job. Pick a team and play ball. Your excuses are beyond pathetic and we’ve heard them all. Please. Enough.

I would advocate that if your republican congressman isn’t supporting the president, well, you change your congressman. It’s not working. The system is broken. Our majorities have produced little but drama and palace intrigue. They are walking back from supporting the agenda we agreed on. In short, they are acting like congressmen. They won’t change without impetus to do so; and we are that impetus. Call your Representative and your Senator. Tell them you expect them to support the Trump agenda, or you will vow to see them replaced. They will hide from you, they will seek to appease you. They will use phrases like “let’s see how it turns out” and “let’s get to the bottom of this.” Ask them: get to the bottom of what, exactly? This is absurd. Please. Enough.

 

Comey is a shattered civil servant, trapped by contradictory statements between mysterious “memos” and his sworn testimony. It won’t end well for him. Trump is not under investigation. He is, however, the victim of a murderous and reckless media, as well as a staff that couldn’t navigate their way through a game of Connect Four. We can do better. We will. Trump deserves the same shot we’ve given every US president. It’s up to us to see that he gets it. We can’t entrust our liberties and our future to a gutless congress, an activist federal court full of seditious hacks or a bloodthirsty media who will stop at nothing to destroy Trump. Please. Enough.

What can we do? Tell all of your representation in Washington that you expect a fervent defense of the president and you want his agenda moved. Now. If they can’t commit, find a willing primary opponent, or run yourself. I’ll be there to help. I won’t stand by and watch another day of this madness. I choose action over anxiety. I choose to fight for what I believe. If enough of you join me, we will turn the oppressive tide of division and acrimony. We can stand with one voice as republicans and tell our representation…Please. Enough.

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

James B. Comey: A One Man Wall of Injustice

James B. Comey: A One Man Wall of Injustice

Feature Posts, Legal, Media, News, Politics

Let’s take a minute, maybe a deep breath, and walk through President Trump’s decision to fire the Director of the FBI. It’s not a walk that makes any sense unless you walk backwards. The established media and beltway democrats will do almost anything to persuade you to do otherwise.

The soul-crushing, ethos crippling power of presidential campaign politics has brought down smarter and better men than James Comey. He is merely the latest cautionary tale detailing a DC bureaucrat who fought out of his weight class. While J. Edgar Hoover may have admired Comey’s taste for playing both sides against the middle, he almost certainly would have advised against dancing with a lame duck devil in Obama. Hoover was keenly aware of the changing seasons in presidential politics and was a master at manipulating that power vacuum to his favor. Comey lacked even the most remote political sense to navigate the turbulent waters he found himself in.

That’s not to infer Comey is a sympathetic figure in all of this. Few FBI directors in the bureau’s history have been maligned as he has by both sides of the political aisle. Prosecutorial politics is the most dangerous game to be played in Washington. You certainly don’t paint a target on a major party presidential nominee and then let them walk away. Not only did Comey commit that blunder, he then informed the world, twice, that he had all the reason in the world to bring charges, but inexplicably did not. Here is where we must tread off the beaten path to trace Comey’s travels to the trash bin of history.

We know the DOJ and Loretta Lynch had zero intention of bringing charges against Hillary Clinton. We also know Comey was explicitly instructed not to refer to the email and server investigation as “criminal” in nature. It was here that Jimbo should’ve seen the writing on the wall. The moves he made subsequently show a tortured vision of personal angst and lack of foresight on Comey’s part. When the NY Times reported on the Clinton basement server, Comey should have realized that he had the misfortune of being at the helm of an un-winnable war: defy the DOJ and conduct an adequate criminal investigation into Clinton’s brazen act against American interests, and be fired, or abide by partisan wishes and lose the faith of the Bureau.

So, essentially, Comey came to a fork in the road. Unfortunately, both the roads ahead led off a cliff. In this instance, there is only one choice: turn around or resign. Instead, he forged ahead in the hopes a bridge could be built by the time he reached the cliff. Not smart. Either way, it doesn’t matter. It’s all proof positive that Comey lacked the leadership ability to run an agency like the FBI. He was compromised, ethically and otherwise, and there was no changing that. It threatened the promise of any apolitical investigation by the FBI in the future. He had to go, and I understand why the president waited to do so. It was clear to me, and most political observers, that Comey was going to string this investigation into Russia out as long as possible to keep his job. It was awkwardly apparent, and was it was aided and abetted by a Congress desperate to keep a strong executive on a leash. A political marriage made in hell for the constitution.

In closing, this is just another shot fired in a deep state war that will not end soon. Trump is in the fight for keeps and, frankly, so is his opposition. Who is the opposition, you ask? Everybody. The president has at his disposal two main weapons in this war: his powers as president, and the hearts and minds of the American silent majority. The opposition seek to disarm him of both. It will take vigilance and a constant pushback by those who support President Trump to stop this from happening. James Comey put himself, time and time again, ahead of the interests of the American people. It was for that reason he was fired. Trump righted a wrong. A wall of injustice has been removed, but the remodeling is far, far from over.

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

The Great Experiment: Making Sense Common Again

The Great Experiment: Making Sense Common Again

Feature Posts, News, Politics

Donald J. Trump has been known to describe himself as a “common sense politician,” as opposed to a traditional partisan ideologue. He is not wrong. He is now a walking and talking embodiment of the empirical impossibility of introducing common sense to the dysfunctional cesspool of Washington. 100 days in, I’ve seen enough to know I’m witnessing a controlled political experiment that will illustrate our worst fears as traditional republicans in a two-party system. A place where common sense is exceedingly uncommon, where results are as rare as a lunar eclipse and happen under similar lighting conditions.

President Trump is not a contradiction, it just looks that way to those immersed in the beltway scene. I recently spent an hour a few feet from the man as he gave a furious and surgically strategic speech to a capacity crowd in deep blue Harrisburg, PA. Shoulder to shoulder with the masses, I joined the fray in expressing my outrage towards a rogue and irresponsible media. I joined in the somewhat good-natured cat calls towards the congressmen present for the lack of resolute and actionable results. For a few shining moments we all once again embraced the promise, the tantalizing precept that a common sense, deal maker could usher in a new era of American prosperity. Then, with tragic and swift speed, that precept was challenged yet again by the news of another six month budget extension. Ostensibly, it appears an even-handed deal sparing both parties the political suicide of embracing a government shutdown. Deeper, though, we see the hallmarks of classic beltway capitulation…common sense meeting the immovable object.

The president didn’t pick this team. He didn’t draft them or sign them as free agents. He didn’t pick the coaches and he can only make strong suggestions as to the game plan he wants to deploy. His “team” is named Congress, and they’re pretty much the Cleveland Browns in the world of politics. Nonetheless, the president must own this team and find a way to win. Only this metaphor fails to reveal the deep divisions of power that cloud our current political landscape. Trump can’t unilaterally replace Speaker Ryan. It doesn’t work that way (but that doesn’t stop me from internally visualizing the act on a daily basis as a part of my meditation exercises). After all, even if you want to fire a head coach, make sure your GM isn’t his best friend from back home.

So again, common sense meets a wall. The president must now seriously weigh the cost/benefit ratio of upending his executive staff. Results in Washington are habitually and religiously delayed for purposes of self-preservation. No one is happier than Chief-of-Staff Reince Priebus and Speaker Ryan about the budget extension. It practically guarantees them a five month lifeline to string out the Health Care and Tax Reform deals that are always seemingly just out of reach. Eventually, Trump will lose his patience. He’ll take a hard look at the game clock, the upcoming schedule, and he’ll throw the whole thing on its axis. President Trump is not a man comfortable with the idea of letting others controlling his fate. It defies everything he stands for and has built, down to a molecular level of his being. This 100 day experiment has been an impressive display of patience, balanced out by a frenzied and targeted rollback of Obama policies, both foreign and domestic.

My warning to my friends in Congress: the president is running out of executive orders, actions and patience. The GOP establishment continues to fight on their islands, like Japanese soldiers who never got word they lost the war months ago. We, as a party, bet on the long shot and we won. And when you win, you get paid. Congress is trying to keep us at the tables to play longer, a classic tactic of the house. We’re onto you, and we want our big chip cashed. We want our president at the wheel. We want what we voted for: a chance. If we don’t get it, the house will pay out, one way or another. In the case of the House of Representatives, it will be literal. Consider yourselves warned.

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.

Trump and Obama: A Comparison of Goals, Strategies and Tactics

Trump and Obama: A Comparison of Goals, Strategies and Tactics

Feature Posts, Military, News, Politics

While campaigning for president, Donald Trump was severely critical of Barrack Obama’s foreign policy. He drew particular attention to his predecessor’s preference for announcing to the world his military strategies. Obama’s decision to move troops into Mosul and announce it publicly weeks in advance was a particular sore spot with Trump. In one debate after another Trump warned that if he were elected President he would not be foolish enough to tell his enemies his military strategies, lest he give them an opportunity to take countermeasures. The heartburn many Trump supports are feeling right now over the Syrian missile strike is due to the different ways in which Obama and Trump publicly discuss their use of the military. This article will explain how different approaches to discussing foreign policy can shape public perception and create concerns.

It will help to have a basic understanding of the different types of military actions, which can be roughly divided into three categories: goals, strategies, and tactics. Goals are the things we hope to accomplish. Strategies are the plans or blueprints we devise to achieve our goals. Tactics are the specific tasks we undertake to support a goal. A company of soldiers may be sent to a village to remove terrorists. This is a goal. Once a goal is established, the next step is deciding how it’s going to be accomplished. When we discuss how something is going to be done we’re talking about strategies and tactics.

A strategy for soldiers trying to eliminate terrorists from a village might involve clearing buildings. A tactic would be to use teams of four men who go from building to building conducting a physical search. That’s one strategy but it’s not the only one available. A different strategy would be to kill all the occupants of the village. A tactic to accomplish that would be aerial bombing. There are different tactics and strategies that can be employed to accomplish any goal.

President Obama spoke publicly about where he was going to deploy his troops. Troop placement is a strategy. He discussed what his troops were going to do. Troop activity is a tactic. He didn’t discuss radical Islamic terrorism or its removal. To do so would define a goal and he wasn’t interested in revealing his goals. He chose instead to reveal his strategies and tactics. What we see with Donald Trump is the exact opposite. Trump has said repeatedly that his main foreign policy goal is the elimination of radical Islamic terrorism. But when pressed to reveal his strategies and tactics, he’s remained silent. It’s only after a particular tactic has been used that we learn how he plans to accomplish his goals.

Public trust is more influenced by strategies and tactics than goals. A new foreign policy goal may go unnoticed by the media. A missile launch or the deployment of a carrier group will dominate the news headlines. It’s easy to trust a president when they tell you what they’re going to do, tactically or strategically. And Obama influenced public opinion regularly by showcasing strategies and tactics.

Trump hasn’t told us what he plans to do, strategically or tactically in the Middle East. He’s chosen only to discuss his goals. He’s openly criticized regime change as a foreign policy goal. That’s what he plans not to do. The main goal he’s endorsed is the elimination of ISIS. Everything he does then, strategically and tactically, will support that goal—even though it may seem as if it supports a different one.

The fact that Trump prefers to conceal his strategies and tactics has created fear among people who need to trust him. But it shouldn’t. Although public perception is shaped more by strategies and tactics, goals are far more important. Trump’s goals have been clearly defined. They’re reasonable. Eliminating ISIS is a goal that no sensible person would question.

Some have backed Trump’s decision to send missiles into Syria not because they approve of his tactics, but because they understand and agree with his goal. Others who have previously criticized him are backing him because they mistakenly think he’s supporting a goal that he does not. (Their support will only last until they realize their miscalculation.)

His former supporters who have turned critical suspect that his tactics are supporting a goal they don’t approve of. I believe those fears are unfounded. If we know anything about Trump, we know what his goals are. He’s been telling us about them for decades. To suddenly change them would be out of character. We need to learn how to trust a President who only reveals his goals and not his strategies or tactics.

I will admit, it’s possible that Trump may, in fact, be targeting the Assad regime for change. But if that is the case, we must then ask if it’s a change of policy or an isolated incident. If it’s an isolated incident, Trump is still endorsing the goals he was elected on. If, as some fear, regime change has become his new policy, then we have reason to be concerned. But at this point, we have no way of knowing if that’s true.

David Hayes

Paramedic / Author / Citizen Journalist/Retired Medic

60 Tomahawk Missiles & a 1,000 Questions

60 Tomahawk Missiles & a 1,000 Questions

Feature Posts, Military, News, Politics

Politicians, per se, are not a complicated bunch. Oh, sure, they fancy themselves worldly and mysterious guardians of democracy; but they’re easier to read than my daughter’s edition of “Everybody Poops” and the commonalities don’t end there.

Donald J. Trump is no politician. That’s precisely why he confounds the media and Congress, alike. He’s not a man given to structured policy schematics, abbreviated session calendars or choreographed PowerPoint presentations. He has an objective, and every day that objective isn’t reached is a day that must produce tangible momentum towards reaching it the next day. Everything we do know about the man, is outweighed only by what we don’t know.

Normalizing the abnormal seems to be the order of the day; so why be surprised we have a president who will fire off 60 tomahawk missiles at a Syrian air base unannounced on a Thursday evening…after dinner with the Chinese President…from his beach resort residence? Wait, what? Yeah, that’ll grab your attention if you’re a low information voter. You must’ve thought Trump would be buried in a White House bunker calling out coordinates. That’s not Donald Trump and that’s not how he handles business.

President Trump leaving Press Conference about Syrian Airstrike.

I’m not sure who was more surprised when the missiles landed, Assad or President Xi, who was probably sipping on an umbrella drink poolside. Rumor has it, Xi told an aid, “better call that fat ass in Pyongyang and tell him to find a deep hole and stay there.”  This is called the “Trump Effect.” We’ve seen it in business and in the campaign, now the world wonders if they just got a glimpse of Ronald Reagan’s ghost. The last thing Putin needs in the White House is another cowboy. One more willing to bomb you to oblivion, than put boots on the ground.

When I put my ear to the Internet last night, I heard a lot of nervous talk about regime change and war with Russia. Seems we have let the last 25 years skew our vision of US military command and competence. For that, who can blame you? But if you’re waiting for Putin to launch a war against the most powerful country on earth, then take your vitamins and get plenty of exercise, because it’ll be a while.

You see, Russia’s first action after the air base was destroyed, was to go running to the UN. Really? Actually, yeah, it’s all they can do. They will get entrenched and ready to fight off a UN Resolution from the Security Council condemning the chemical weapons attack. Who actually ordered the attack (Assad, Iran, Rogue CIA) doesn’t really matter. It happened and the world saw it happen. Russia knows it is in a bad spot, and that Assad lost all perception of inevitability he had just 72 hours ago to retain power. Fishy timing? Sure, but that doesn’t change a thing.

Trump had a unanimous National Security Counsel for this strike, and an overwhelming number of allies in support. Russia clearly knew this, or something like it, was going to happen. They will stand their ground, but not dream of going further unless we unilaterally engage in Bush/Obama style regime change. Which, we won’t. I don’t care what neocon wet dream Sen McCain has in his crusty old coconut. Ain’t happening, no way. Unless we see a Gulf War 1 type of international coalition, Trump won’t be storming Damascus anytime soon. Trust me.

New administration, new rules. If you want to believe this makes Trump a neocon and a warmonger, Godspeed to you. I’ll be damned if I’m going to ask my president to go to congress and beg for permission to hit a airfield that launched a chemical weapons attack on civilians. Sorry, Rand Paul. I could be wrong, and there could be a more to come, but I’m betting not. I’m betting on the threat of more to come being good enough. I’m betting on Donald Trump…because in reality, that bet was already made on November 8th.

Adam Gingrich

Founder of Wick Media Productions. Worked for Donald Trump's Campaign, overseeing the Pennsylvania region, Adam has been a Political Consultant for most of his adult life.